First draft of Georgia’s redistricting map released by State Senate

Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan and State Senator John Flanders Kennedy, chairman of the chamber’s Redistricting and Reapportionment Committee, released a proposed congressional district map that would increase the size of districts in rural South Georgia to reflect losses in population during the last decade. “This map not only meets principles of redistricting, but we are proud to present a map […]

This image is a representation of the redrawing of Georgia’s Congressional districts, put forth by Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan and John Flanders Kennedy. (Image provided by the Lieutenant Governor’s office)
Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan and State Senator John Flanders Kennedy, chairman of the chamber’s Redistricting and Reapportionment Committee, released a proposed congressional district map that would increase the size of districts in rural South Georgia to reflect losses in population during the last decade.
“This map not only meets principles of redistricting, but we are proud to present a map that regardless of political party, Georgians can be proud of,” Duncan said. “Ensuring that any maps we produce are fair, compact, and keep communities of interest together will continue to be of upmost importance.”
Democrat Lucy McBath captured the Sixth Congressional District in Atlanta’s northern suburbs in 2018 after it had been in Republican hands for decades, then won reelection last year. According to the State Senate version, McBath would appear to be more vulnerable but the State’s upper chamber did not gerrymander it into nearly as red a seat as expected. Most of Republican-leaning Forsyth County would inside the Sixth District for the first time. The district would retain East Cobb and North Fulton but lose northern DeKalb County. However, the diverse growth of Forsyth could offset the losses of Northern DeKalb County.
Also, this plan would protect Rep. Sanford Bishop in Georgia’s Second District and Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux in Georgia’s Seventh District.
“Even given the delay of official Census numbers, the Senate Redistricting Committee has diligently worked to ensure that we hear from citizens across all regions of the state,” said Chairman John F. Kennedy. “Looking at this map, it is obvious that Georgians have been heard, and will continue to be heard.”
The 10th Congressional District would belong to Rep. Andrew Clyde. Under the Duncan and Kennedy’s map, the 10th would lose northern Columbia County, southern Baldwin County and all of McDuffie and Warren counties, while moving further north to gain Elbert, Jackson, portions of Gwinnett and Madison counties, plus absorbing all of Athens-Clarke County. Currently, the 10th District does not include the northern portion of Athens-Clarke. It would appear the 9th District would open up and be more competitive in 2022.
The 12th Congressional District, which borders the 10th to the south, would shift northward to take in the part of Columbia County it does not contain now as well as all of McDuffie, Jefferson, Washington and Wilkinson counties. On its southern end, the 12th would lose Coffee, Jeff Davis, Appling and Wheeler counties.
The House did not release their version of Georgia’s congressional map.
Georgia’s redistricting special session begins Wednesday, November 3rd and is expected to run though the week of Thanksgiving.


Read MoreFeedzy

Share:

Table of Contents

On Key

Related Posts

info@awesomechuck.com

© All Rights Reserved 2021